HOW TO WIRE A VOLUME CONTROL TO YOUR MIC

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The first thing to note about a volume control is that it is not linear, but logarithmic potentiometer. Logarithmic potentiometer means the resistance that you are changing when you adjust the control is not even throughout the pot. The first half of the pot represents about 30% of the total resistance of the pot, and the second half contains the remainder of the resistance. With the volume all the way down, there is maximum resistance, and as you turn up the volume, you decrease the resistance. A harp player uses his mic at max volume (10) and turns it back when a decrease in volume is needed. This means that he is operating in the course adjustment area of the pot and allows for no fine adjustment in volume, only a course adjustment relegating the pot to a virtual ON/OFF switch.




Technically, this is the correct way to wire a volume control. When we use this method for our mic, we are operating with 10 being max volume. This puts us in the course adjustment range and makes it more of a rotary ON/OFF switch. Impedence to the element will equal the impedance of the control.




This method will have you operating the control backwards with 1 being max and 10 being minimum. This will have you operating in the fine adjustment area of the volume control and will give you more control. Impedance to the element will equal the impedance of the control.




This method will also have you operating the control backwards with 1 being max and 10 minimum. This will have you operating in the fine adjustment area of the volume control and will give you more control. This makes the control a variable resistor and gives the most control (in fine adjustments) over the mic output. Impedance to the element will equal the impedance of the grid leak resistor plus the resistance of the control position.



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